Undersea Observatory Tower

View a natural coral reef from our underwater observatory

Adult
$20
Child
$11
Family Day Pass (2 Adults; Up to 4 Children)
$65

The only one of its kind in the Caribbean, our air conditioned Undersea Observatory Tower stands 100 feet offshore. It is a three story tower with the lowest level taking you 15 feet below the surface to an Undersea Observatory where you can view the ever-changing life on a natural coral reef. At mid-level, visit the Predator Tank (under renovation) and, from the top level enjoy spectacular views of the St. Thomas shoreline and neighboring islands.

From the Undersea Observatory, you have a unique opportunity to stay dry while viewing totally non-captive fish and other marine creatures as they go about their daily activities on the reef completely unaware of your presence. Marine life here is free to come and go at will. You never know what might swim by – today a barracuda, tomorrow a turtle. Watch large schools of horse-eye jacks suspended in the current. Sometimes the tower is surrounded by huge schools of silversides.

Don’t miss our daily feeding at 12:40pm. Watch hundreds of fish engulf our diver outside the observation windows and listen to our Aquarists talk about the coral reefs and the creatures that inhabit it.

See an Ocean Conservancy coral nursery demonstration site and learn how coral nurseries can work to help recover threatened Staghorn and Elkhorn coral species.

Or perhaps you would like to turn things around and be out there with the fish looking in. Then sign up for Sea Trek, the ultimate helmet dive.

The Predator Tank at mid-level (currently being renovated) contains a variety of schooling fish, sharks, tarpon and other large fish found in deeper waters.

The top level of the Tower is home to our reservations desk for all the Activities at Coral World. In addition to spectacular island views at this level, from December through March, you may get lucky and see a humpback whale and her calf breaching or tail or flipper slapping the passage between the Tower and Thatch Cay. Humpback whales migrate to the Caribbean in the fall to breed and calve. In the winter, they begin their migration back to colder waters where they will gorge themselves during the summer.