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Earth Day 2011 Water Bay Cleanup

On April 22, 2011 Coral World staff organized an Earth Day Underwater Cleanup in coordination with Reef Alliance and Ocean Conservancy.  This is the 3rd annual cleanup that Coral World has participated in since the Reef Alliance Day cleanups began in 2009.  This year’s cleanup was once again in Water Bay, St. Thomas.  An assembly…

Red Tailed Hawk Found in Frenchtown

A red tailed hawk was found under a swing set in a lady’s yard in Frenchtown. He had been there a couple of days without moving. She called for someone to come and take a look at the hawk and find out why he was just sitting in the yard. Erica, Coral World’s vet tech,…

Silly Pelican

This silly little pelican was found just outside of Redhook acting all dazed and confused.  He came to Coral World and stayed until he was ready to take off on his own again.

Young Turtle Found Shot

Beaker was a young Hawksbill sea turtle found in Cowpet Bay. He had washed up on shore and was unresponsive. Concerned residents called the Sea Turtle Assistance and Rescue Network (STAR). Erica Palmer, Coral World Ocean Park Veterinary Technician and STAR St Thomas responder came to the turtle’s rescue. He had a puncture wound to…

Happy

Happy was a juvenile hawksbill turtle that was found floating listlessly in Great Bay at the Ritz Carlton, in June of 2014. He was getting tossed around in the waves, not moving at all. Erica, Coral World’s vet tech and STAR Network responder, brought him back to Coral World. She put him in a pool…

Health Beat: Vet Tech Treats Residents and Visitors at Coral World

In her eight years as a veterinarian technician at Coral World Marine Park, Erica Palmer has treated almost every kind of animal that swims or flies by the island of St. Thomas, as well as a bevy of land-based inhabitants. This spring she finally had the opportunity to help out a couple of frigates, one…

Sea Turtle Enrichment

Here at Coral World Ocean Park we use animal enrichment to help stimulate the animals that we care for and simulate real world situations for them to interact with. Melissa Sheffer, a former Coral World intern with the Aquarium Department, worked on a research project this past spring involving the four green sea turtles that…

Coral World Ocean Park Shark Shallows “Lemon Sharks 2”

Lemon Sharks are normally considered solitary animals. There are only two times in their life when you will find them in groups. First it is juveniles like these. Multiple female sharks will use the same nursery areas, so you will have young sharks growing up together. As they get larger they move into deeper waters and…

Coral World Ocean Park Shark Shallows “Lemon Sharks 1”

Lemon sharks get their name from the color of their skin. However, ours are more of a beige color and that is because of their age. If you look closely at the fins on the sharks’ back you will see that they are more yellow. That is where the color change from juvenile to adult…

Coral World Ocean Park Shark Shallows “Apex Predators”

At Coral World, we have what’s known as a “head-start” program. We bring very young sharks in at the time in their life where they are most vulnerable to larger predators and fisherman. We let them grow up here in the safety of this protected environment, where we keep them for a few years until…

Coral World Ocean Park Shark Shallows “Shark Pups”

The exhibit, Shark Shallows, was designed to mimic shallow water areas where you can find juvenile sharks. Female sharks swim into areas such as bays, mangrove lagoons and even estuaries (areas where rivers meet the sea) to find protection while giving birth to her new pups. Like all other animals, this is the time when…

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