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Marine Life

The Age Old Question: Do Fish Sleep?

Do fish sleep? A question that you many have pondered at one time or another, but rarely find an answer to. Lo and behold, fish DO sleep, and some have a very interesting way of doing so. Sleeping at night on a coral reef can be a dangerous thing. Any predator can swim by and…

The Horse-Eye Jack

The horse-eye jack is an awesome fish that was first scientifically described in 1831 by Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz. It has since grown in popularity in the dive community because it is both a coastal and a shipwreck dwelling species making it a common fish to see at most dive sites. Horse-eye jacks swim in…

The Bizarre Looking Trumpetfish (Aulostomus Maculatus)

The bizarre looking trumpetfish (Aulostomus maculatus) gets its name from having a snout shaped similar to the mouthpiece of a trumpet. They can often be found swaying amongst the sea whips flowing back and forth with the swell. This strange behavior can be seen on our Sea Trek trail or through the windows of the Undersea Observatory Tower on any given day. Camouflaging itself in this way not only offers protection from its main predators, eels and groupers, but also provides a means of ambush when hunting. The mouth of a trumpetfish can open wider than its whole body and create a vacuum effect on unsuspecting small fish and shrimp. These masters of their surroundings can also change their colors to blend with schools of other fish or to play wingman with larger fish. Their chromatophore color changing abilities are…

Humpback Whales in the Virgin Islands

It is that time of year again where everyone in the Virgin Islands is keeping an eye on the water hoping to catch a glimpse of the Humpback Whale. Humpback whales migrate through the Caribbean to our warm tropical waters where they give birth to new calves and to mate during the winter months In…